Your current age.
The annual salary and any pay bonuses you are currently receiving. This value is projected through retirement age and used for calculating future annual 401(k) plan contributions.
The annual percentage contribution you are currently making to your regular 401(k) account.
The age at which you expect to retire.
The number of years you expect to spend in retirement. You can determine this value by subtracting your retirement age from your life expectancy.
The expected annual growth rate of your income. This growth rate will be applied to your income each year until your retirement age and is used to estimate future 401(k) contributions.
The federal tax rate that is applied at your current income level. Although taxes are typically computed using a composite of several rates, the highest rate applied at your income level is used for simplicity.
The federal tax rate that you expect during your retirement.
The rate of return you expect your 401(k) account to earn prior to your retirement. Your rates will vary depending on your tolerance for risk with the highest risk investments usually generating the highest return.
The rate of return you expect to earn after your retirement. Most experts suggest a more conservative investment strategy during retirement, which may provide a lower expected rate of return during your retirement than you were achieving before your retirement.
 
 

Roth Analyzer

This tool will help you determine whether to save to your regular or Roth 401(k) account.

Based on your desired 401(k) savings level, this tool will compute your retirement balance and expected income for the available combinations of regular and Roth contributions and display them in the table below. The tool will also allow you to do "what if" analysis under different tax and rate of return assumptions. State and local taxes, insurance and other benefit plan deductions are not included in this analysis.

After you've entered / confirmed your information below, press "Calculate" to view your comparison results.

Input - Analysis Information
Age:  
Annual Salary: $
Contribution Rate:  % Apply Catch-Up1
Retirement Age:  
Years in Retirement:   Click to estimate your years in retirement using IRS life expectancy tables.
Salary Growth Rate:  %
Estimated Marginal Tax Rate:  
   Current:  
   At Distribution:  
Rate of Return:  
   Pre-Retirement:  
   Post-Retirement:  
Analysis Option:  
    Keep my take-home pay the same2
    Keep my 401(k) savings the same3

1Catch-up contributions are included in the analysis when you are age 50 or above and have chosen to analyze your contributions at the maximum in both the traditional and Roth 401(k) . For comparison purposes, catch-up contributions are not applied when you are contributing at the maximum in your traditional 401(k), but have chosen to save the equivalent in your Roth on a pretax basis.
2Since Roth 401(k) contributions are made on an after-tax basis, you will be required to contribute more to achieve an equivalent level of savings when compared to a traditional 401(k). This analysis option assumes that the pretax amount allocated to your Roth 401(k) savings is equivalent to your traditional 401(k) contribution, meaning your actual Roth 401(k) contribution is less, depending on your tax rate.
3Since Roth 401(k) contributions are made on an after-tax basis, you will be required to contribute more to achieve an equivalent level of savings when compared to a traditional 401(k). This analysis option assumes that you are able to contribute equal amounts to your traditional and Roth 401(k) accounts on an after-tax basis. Depending on your tax rate, your Roth 401(k) contribution needed to achieve an equal savings level may be significantly higher than your traditional 401(k) contribution.


The calculators provide hypothetical examples and are not intended to represent past or future performance of a specific investment which cannot be predicted or guaranteed, or to provide specific advice to any individual. Rates of return will vary over time. Those investments offering a higher rate of return also involve a higher degree of risk.